Posts Tagged ‘New Jersey’

Last night was the season finale of Top Chef: Las Vegas. It was sad to see Jenn go last week, but I’m glad she made it to the final 4. The final 3 contestants– Kevin and Bryan and Michael Voltaggio– battled for the title of Top Chef. When presenting their dishes to the judges, each of the finalists had successful and faulty dishes. At the Judges Table, I honestly couldn’t figure out who would be pronounced Top Chef! For me, it was a complete tossup. Kevin, Bryan, and Michael have been the most consistent all season. They all deserved to be in the finals, and they are all great chefs. I particularly enjoyed the fact that each of them portray very different styles in their cuisine. Kevin: Flavorful simplicity. Bryan: Combining traditional and modern styles. Michael: Fearless innovation.

Kevin was eliminated first. Thus, like we suspected from the beginning, it was a battle between the Voltaggio brothers. The brothers have continuously proven their culinary proficiency by creating and successfully executing dishes with greater difficulty than any of the other contestants in the competition. So, though we may have foreseen this brotherly battle, which Voltaggio would take it all? The comments from the judges made it seem like Bryan had it; his venison dish and dessert were on point. Instead, to my personal astonishment, Padma proclaimed Michael Voltaggio as Top Chef. Yes, Michael Voltaggio one-upped his big brother with his passionate love for food, creativity, and his unwavering ability to take risks.

My reaction was: I can’t believe Michael won! I thought, sure enough, Kevin and Bryan both had a better chance than Michael. Then, once it came down to the brothers, I was still thinking Bryan.. Bryan.. It’s definitely Bryan. I was disappointed when I heard “Michael, you are Top Chef.” WHAT??!?! But after sleeping on it, I stopped being so bitter and started to understand why the judges chose Michael.

Both Bryan and Michael are very detail-oriented chefs with a great amount of skill and technique. However, Michael is willing to try something unique with the risk of failing. He doesn’t ever play it safe, and that’s the main reason why I believe he ended up winning the competition. The difference between a good chef and a great chef is the passion to create.. To do more than just produce tasty food.. To tell a story on the plate. When I think back to the previous challenges, Michael has always intrigued the judges in that sense. His odd pairings would always progressively come together with each bite. That. Is. Amazing.

Also last night, on Man v. Food, Adam Richman found himself in New Brunswick, New Jersey. He took on the Fat Sandwich Challenge at the R.U. Hungry Grease Truck. But before his challenge, Adam uncovered some massively delicious looking sandwiches at Harold’s Deli and Stuff Yer Face. Since the episode last night, I couldn’t stop thinking about the stromboli from Stuff Yer Face. I wanted one so badly, but NJ is so far away… Like over 3000 miles far. So, as I was up all night suffering from a serious stromboli craving, I came up with this idea to create my own stromboli! Oh, what I will do for food..

I have a tendency to make everything so much harder for myself in the kitchen. Though I could have bought a pre-made pizza dough at the grocery store, it wouldn’t have been as exciting to see the final stromboli product. My favorite part about cooking is the challenge– tackling recipes from all walks of food without really knowing how it will turn out. I want to know I can make anything! And since I started this blog– the encouragement I needed to expand from my normal repertoire– I’m slowly finding that I can.

I’ve only made pizza dough one other time and I don’t remember the recipe being that great. So, I looked for a new one that would be right for my stromboli. First, I look at the ingredients (to see if I have them all) and scan the directions. If it looks doable, I skim through comments or reviews about the recipe. Usually, I don’t risk using a recipe without any reviews.. that can’t be a good sign. Eventually, I came across Jay’s Signature Pizza Crust featured on AllRecipes. Very good ratings from almost 2,000 people. Sold. I began my mission with the dough.

Jay’s Signature Pizza Crust


2-1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast (1 packet)
1/2 teaspoon brown sugar
1-1/2 cups warm water (110 degreesF)
1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons olive oil
3-1/3 cups all-purpose flour


1. In a large bowl, dissolve the yeast and brown sugar in the water, and let sit for 10 minutes.

2. Stir the salt and the oil into the yeast solution. Mix in 2-1/2 cups of the flour.

3. Turn dough out onto a clean, well floured surface, and knead in more flour until the dough is no longer sticky. Place the dough into a well oiled bowl, and cover with a cloth. Let the dough rise until double; this should take about 1 hour. Punch down the dough, and form a tight ball. Allow the dough to relax for a minute before rolling out. Use for your favorite pizza recipe.

4. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. If you are baking the dough on a pizza stone, you may place your toppings on the dough, and bake immediately. If yu are baking your pizza in a pan, lightly oil the pan, and let the dough rise for 15-20 minutes before topping and baking it.

5. Bake pizza in preheated oven, until the cheese and crust are golden brown, about 15-20 minutes.

Without a bread machine or even a Kitchen Aid stand mixer, my dough turned out wonderful! I tried to use only enough flour. So although in the INGREDIENTS section it says 3-1/3 cups all-purpose flour, this is just an estimate. If you read the directions, you start out with only 2-1/2 cups. From there, I kept the remaining flour nearby but gradually worked just enough flour into the dough. I didn’t end up using it all even after using some to flour my surface.

While my dough was rising for about an hour, I had time to make my filling. That’s the best part about making a stromboli; you can stuff it with whatever you want! I decided to go big.. spicy sausage, pepperoni slices, sauteed green pepper and onions, sliced tomato, and mozzarella cheese! Mmmmm. For the spicy sausage, I just removed the casing from the links and cooked the meat up in a saucepan. Threw the green peppers and onions into another saucepan. Then, after everything was to my liking, I let the ingredients cool for a little bit. Putting the hot ingredients directing on my dough might damage it! I intended to make a pretty large stromboli (I was incredibly hungry for it!), so I cut out 1/3 of the dough and rolled out a pretty good length. I made sure to give it some width, because I knew I had a lot of ingredients to get in there! Just do not roll your dough too thin– there is a good chance it will break while you are trying to seal it up or it won’t be able to carry the weight of the filling.

The dough is very elastic, so I was able to seal it up with a few pinches! Instead of 425 degrees F, I set my oven to 45o. I turned over my stromboli (pinch side down) and plopped it on a lightly greased baking sheet (just a little cooking spray). To ensure that I would get a nice crisp exterior, I drizzled a little less than a teaspoon of olive oil into my palm and rubbed it over the stromboli– a light coat. Then, I sprinkled a little Italian seasoning and shredded parmesano reggiano on top. About 15-20 minutes later..

Sure, it looks like just a piece of bread with a very nice golden crust.. But when you cut it open..

There are no words. It was heaven on a platter. This is the only way to eat a stromboli.. hot from the oven with everything oozing together! LOVE IT.. making more more more!

Thank you, Adam Richman.. After watching you eat that stromboli in last night’s episode, I got inspired (and hungry) and accomplished this homemade feat.

nom nom nom.



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